This issue includes the following headings: Estimating International Poverty Lines; Global Inequality between 1988 and 2008 and the "Elephant Graph"; Challenges in Counting theWorld's Hungry; Incentive Effects of Antipoverty Programs; Importing High Food Pricesby Exporting; The Decision to Invest in Child Quality over Quantity; Supporting Parents to ImprovePreschool Outcomes; Can Conditional Cash Transfers Improve Child Nutrition?; Globalization, Comparative Advantage, and Fertility Decisions; Experimental Justice Reform; and the Recent World Bank Research Publications an

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The first Sustainable Development Goal of the 2030 Agenda calls for ending “poverty in all its forms everywhere”, therefore recognising that poverty is more than just a lack of a sufficient income. Nevertheless, some scholars argue that an income-based measure of poverty is able to sufficiently capture poverty in other dimensions as well. This claim, however, has so far not been substantiated by any cross-country empirical evidence.

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This Operational Note is part of the Supplementary Volume of 10 Operational Notes to the Reference Document No 26 on Social Protection across the Humanitarian-Development Nexus. A Game Changer in Supporting People through Crises. It was produced as part of the ‘Guidance Package on Social Protection across the Humanitarian- Development Nexus’ (SPaN).

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Using life course analysis from the Young Lives study of 12,000 children growing up in Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam over the past 15 years, this book draws on evidence on two cohorts of children, aged from 1 to 15 and from 8 to 22. It examines how poverty affects children’s development in low and middle income countries, and how policy has been used to improve their lives, then goes on to show when key developmental differences occur.

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The world is going through a period of change. Volatile economic growth, climate change, the technological revolution, migration and the demographic transition all reflect this, as do the impacts these changes are having on society and the challenges they pose for public policies. Continuing the social progress made in Latin America and the Caribbean, ensuring no ground is lost and attaining the Goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development while ensuring that no one is left behind will require new and greater public policy efforts to enhance coverage and quality.

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This report has been produced through a joint effort between the Government of Indonesia and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in Indonesia to deepen our understanding of the situation of children in the country and make this data available for informed policy planning and monitoring. Investments in children are a precondition for achieving Agenda 2030, with its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and we believe that every rupiah spent to improve a child’s well-being is an investment in Indonesia’s human capital and sustainable economic growth.

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Lost in (in)coordination: Understanding social protection and the SDG indicators

Migration is one of the defining features of the 21st century. It contributes significantly to all aspects of economic and social development everywhere, and as such will be key to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Different opportunities and levels of development in origin countries can drive migration. At the same time, migration can increase development and investment in origin countries, fill labour gaps in host countries and contribute to development along the journey (or, in so-called ‘transit countries’).

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School meals have multiple benefits and there is hard evidence that supports this claim. However, due to the multi-faceted nature of school meals, it is difficult to obtain a complete overview of the evidence. This paper attempts to give such an overview. It collects existing, independent evidence of the benefits and impacts of school meals and uses the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as thematic areas to organize the evidence. The paper also gives an indication of the specific targets to which school meals can contribute.

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FAO’s 43rd Session of the Committee on World Food Security (CFS): food security, 2030 Agenda, and climate change (Part 2 of 2)